Last week, a Louisiana federal district court approved a consent decree (full text) in Cole v. Webster Parish School Board, (WD LA, May 11, 2018).  The suit charged that the school district extensively promoted Christianity in its schools. (See prior posting.)  The consent decree bars prayers at school events, bars religious baccalaureate services, prohibits holding school events at religious venues and bars school officials from promoting their personal religious beliefs to students in class or at school events.  ACLU issued a press release announcing the consent decree.

Source: http://religionclause.blogspot.com/2018/05/consent-decree-settles-louisiana.html

Motherhood is having a moment in books, TV and even women’s magazines, but in feminist theory it’s sadly tabooThe topic of motherhood is having a bit of a moment. In addition to several much-discussed books, the past six weeks alone have brought us Sheila Heti’s Motherhood, which explores the will-I-won’t-I decision all women face at some point or another; Angela Garbes’s Like a Mother, a feminist exploration of the science and culture of pregnancy; and Meaghan O’Connell’s memoir And Now We Have Everything, which gives the warts-and-all treatment to pregnancy, childbirth and motherhood. In recent months motherhood has cropped up across various media, including film (Mother! and Tully), TV (The Letdown), and comedy (Ali Wong and Laurie Kilmartin). Most surprising to me, as someone told by women’s magazine editors for years “we don’t cover motherhood”, is the fact that publications like Elle and Marie Claire appear to have lifted their long-standing ban on motherhood. Apparently, it is finally OK to talk about one of the possible outcomes of all that great sex women’s mags have been promising us for years. Continue reading…

Source: https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/may/26/is-motherhood-the-unfinished-work-of-feminism

Milwaukee police didn’t just assault a basketball player, they damaged the hopes young people of color have of a better lifeSterling Brown: Milwaukee police apologize to NBA playerAnother day, another black man violently assaulted by five rogue police officers for the ever-increasing crime of BWB (breathing while black). This time it was NBA player Sterling Brown. In January, the Bucks rookie was confronted by Milwaukee police at Walgreens for a parking infraction, which resulted in a compliant Brown being wrestled to the ground, handcuffed, tased, arrested – and given a parking ticket. The recently released police body-cam footage was called “disturbing” by Milwaukee’s mayor. Particularly in a city that Bucks president Peter Feigin once called “the most segregated, racist place I’ve ever experienced in my life”. The officers involved have since been disciplined. Now what? Bygones? Related: After my experience with Milwaukee Police, I have to tell my story | Sterling Brown Continue reading…

Source: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2018/may/26/sterling-brown-taser-milwaukee-police-american-dream

The former first daughter on privilege, female leadership, dealing with critics, and how Trump ‘degrades what it means to be American’When the American media describe Chelsea Clinton as royalty, they refer not to her popularity but to her ubiquity. Her very first home was the governor’s mansion in Little Rock, Arkansas; the family home she left for university 18 years later was the White House. Ordinarily, it’s only young royals who grow up in lavish official residences and the pitiless media spotlight, a permanent presence in our consciousness. It is a uniquely strange and unenviable version of celebrity that stole Clinton’s anonymity before she was old enough to spell it.When we meet there is, therefore, a disconcerting sense of deja vu. Everything begins exactly as one might expect. On the previous day there had been the pre-interview call from one of her handlers, who was ostensibly warm and yet conveyed an impression of wary control, leaving me worried about how far I’d be allowed to stray from the subject of Clinton’s new book. The interview takes place at the Clinton Foundation, a vast but discreetly unadvertised expanse of midtown Manhattan office space populated by serious-looking people and elegantly adorned by African-inspired artwork chosen by Clinton’s father. Clinton is waiting in the glass boardroom; the interview starts precisely on schedule, to the second. Continue reading…

Source: https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2018/may/26/chelsea-clinton-vitriol-flung-at-me

Philip Roth’s novel was just one of many banned by a prudish government. It was a decision that led to a landmark court caseThe death of Philip Roth can’t go by without celebrating the part he played nearly 50 years ago in ending the grip of the moral bullies who decided what books we could read in this country. Related: ‘An astonishing force field’: Philip Roth, as remembered by authors and friends Continue reading…

Source: https://www.theguardian.com/books/2018/may/26/philip-roth-how-portnoys-complaint-made-australia-a-better-place