The Association of American Law Schools Section on Law and Religion has issued the following Call for Nominations:Harold Berman Award for Excellence in ScholarshipThe AALS Section on Law and Religion seeks nominations for the Harold Berman Award for Excellence in Scholarship. This annual award recognizes a paper that “has made an outstanding scholarly contribution to the field of law and religion,” in the words of the prize rules. To be eligible, a paper must be published between July 15, 2017 and July 15, 2018. The author must be “a faculty member at an AALS Member School with no more than 10 years’ experience as a faculty member.” Fellows are eligible. Self-nominations are accepted. Nominations should include the name of the author, the title of the paper, a statement of eligibility, and a brief rationale for choosing the paper for the award. Nominations should be sent to Nelson Tebbe at nt277@cornell.edu by August 15, 2018. The winner will receive an award plaque at the AALS annual meeting in January, 2019. The prize committee members are Stephanie Barclay, Thomas C. Berg, Haider Ala Hamoudi, Elizabeth Sepper, and Nelson Tebbe (chair).

Source: http://religionclause.blogspot.com/2018/05/nominations-sought-for-law-faculty-law.html

Yesterday President Donald Trump issued a Presidential Proclamation (full text) declaring May 2018 as Jewish American Heritage Month.  The Proclamation reads in part:The American Jewish community is a shining example of how enshrining freedom of religion and protecting the rights of minorities can strengthen a nation.  Through their rich culture and heritage, the Jewish people have triumphed over adversity and enhanced our country.  For this and many other reasons, the American Jewish community is deserving of our respect, recognition, and gratitude.

Source: http://religionclause.blogspot.com/2018/05/president-proclaims-may-as-jewish.html

According to an EEOC press release, after a 3-week trial in federal district court in New York, a jury awarded $5.1 million in compensatory and punitive damages against United Health Programs of America, Inc. and its parent company for coercing ten employees to engage in religious practices, creating a hostile work environment for nine of them, and firing one employee for opposing these practices.  The EEOC, which filed suit on behalf of the employees, reports:CCG employees were forced to engage in a variety of religious practices at work, including prayer, religious workshops, and spiritual cleansing rituals. These practices were part of a belief system called