If there is one species that Earth’s oceans are abundant with, it’s jellyfish. Thanks to climate change and the general warming of the planet, our oceans are becoming a much more hospitable place for all sorts of jellyfish. However, there will always be those more mysterious and elusive sub-species.

Consider the stygiomedusa gigantea. It is a species of giant jellyfish that is among the rarest in the world. Over the past 110 years, there have only been 115 sightings. According to those who have studied it, stygiomedusa gigantea is one of the largest invertebrate predators in the world.

While its sightings have been rare, luckily a few of the recent ones have been by unmanned ROV vehicles, which allow us to get up close with these terrifying, majestic creatures.

Well, this is going to give me nightmares for a year.

Read more: http://www.viralnova.com/stygiomedusa-gigantea/

When Owen Reese Peterson went to the Department of Veterans Affairs in Talihina, Oklahoma, to get treatment for an infected wound, he never left.

The 73-year-old veteran was there for at least three weeks, but he eventually died from sepsis, a life-threatening complication of an infection that can lead to tissue damage and organ failure. What’s disturbing about his stay at the VA hospital is that before he died on October 3, maggots were found crawling all over his wound.

Executive director Myles Deering said that Peterson did not die because of the maggots, but a physician’s assistant and three nurses have resigned as a result.

Read More: Woman Goes Into Labor And Quickly Realizes Her Doctor Is Totally Drunk

Peterson’s son, Raymie Parker, says that his father wasn’t getting the proper care he needed during his time at the facility. While he said that the nurses were great, he was far from impressed with the senior staff.

Read more: http://www.viralnova.com/maggots-in-wound/